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This unretouched photograph is of trash discharge scooped from a Super-Jet lint cleaner in actual opera- tion on moderately trashy machine picked cotton. You can see plenty of trash... leaves, stems, motes... and a lot of nep-stock. But there’s no spinable fiber. Super-Jet gives you a better net turnout of good spin- ning-quality fiber because it takes out trash; leaves lint in.

AND NO MOVING PARTS IS THE REASON

Here is a cross section of a Super-Jet. It has no moving parts no beaters, no saws nothing to create neps, nothing to wear out. A Lummus de- velopment of gentle air-streams does the work. Write for Bulletin 639.

LUMMUS COTTON GIN CO.

Established 1869 COLUMBUS, GEORGIA ° DALLAS FRESNO MEMPHIS.

Patented

CONTINENTAL'S | ap Cleaner

{np

Has No Screens to Restrict Discharge of Sticks, Stems, Hulls and Motes

Outstanding success and extremely heavy demand for this efficient cleaner have been due to its tremendous cleaning capacity. This cross sec- tion view shows arrangement of revolving serrated discs which effec- tively extract foreign matter from roughly picked cotton in quantities that no conventional cylinder cleaner can remove. The recurring problem of cleaning screens always a nuisance is also eliminated.

Write for Bulletin 190-B which gives complete description.

Entered as second-class matter February 4, 1905, at the Post O/fice at Dallas, Texas, Under Act of Congress of March 3, 1897

BOSS, IT'S THESE LATE SOLVENT SHIPMENTS THAT ARE HOLDING UP PRODUCTION! WE'RE GETTING SO USED TO LATE DELIVERIES, WE

CALL OUR PURCHASING AGENT THE LATE MR. AKERBY!

LATE SOLVENT SHIPMENTS HUH? LEAVE IT TO ME!

MISS JONES, TAKE A MEMO TO AKERBY!

AND IF YOU CAN’T FIND A SUPPLIER WHO'LL GET OUR SOLVENT HERE ON TIME YOU'LL BE THE LATE MR. AKERBY IN YOUR JOB!

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YOU COULDN’T HAVE SHOWN UP AT A BETTER TIME! MAYBE YOU CAN HELP ME OUT OF A JAM OUR SOLVENT

SUPPLIER \;

MR. WEBER OF SKELLYSOLVE TO SEE YOU MR. AKERBY.

...AND YOU CAN FORGET YOUR SOLVENT DELIVERY WORRIES WHEN YOU SWITCH TO SKELLYSOLVE ...

BOY! AM | GLAD | LEARNED ABOUT

NICE WORK! THERE SKELLYSOLVE IN TIME!

WON'T BE ANY MORE “LATE” MR. AKERBY TALK SINCE YOU SWITCHED TO SKELLYSOLVE EVERY SHIPMENT’S ON TIME —AND NOT ONE CASE OF CONTAMINATION!

It may pay you to get further information about

Skellysolve for Animal and Vegetable Oil Extraction APPLICATIONS

SKELLYSOLVE-B. Making edible oils and meals from soybeans, corn germs, flax- seed, peanuts, cottonseed and the like. Closed cup flash point about -25°F. SKELLYSOLVE-C. Making both edible and inedible oils and meals, particu- larly where lower volatility than that of Skellysolve-B is desired because of warm condenser water. Closed cup flash point about 13°F. SKELLYSOLVE-F. Extracting cottonseed, soybean meals and other products in laboratory analytical work. Originally made to conform to A.O.C.S. specifica- tions for petroleum ether, and pharma-

ceutical extractions, where finest qual- ity solvent is desired. Closed cup flash point about -50°F. SKELLYSOLVE-H. Making edible and in- edible oils and meals where greater volatility is desired than that o Skellysolve C or L. Closed cup flash point about -16°F. SKELLYSOLVE-L. For degreasing meat scraps, extracting oil-saturated fuller’s earth or other general extraction. Closed cup flash point about 12°F.

Ask about our new Skelly Petroleum Insoluble Grease.

Skellysolve. Why not. write or.call us.today?

@Skellysolve

SKELLY OIL COMPANY

Industrial Division 605 West 47th Street, Kansas City 41, Mo.

3 COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS

JUNE 2, 1956

The Cotten Gin ond Oi Mill * ON OUR COVER:

PR INN School's out! And, don’t let the demure behaviour

af y She of the young lady on our cover fool you for a See ; minute. As soon as she rounds the corner out of mother’s sight she will cut loose and display all the joy that she feels because there’s no more school for days and days and days. Of course, if she were a boy he wouldn't wait to cut loose and mother already would be wondering what on earth she is going to find to keep him occupied until next September. Don’t worry, though, both the boys and girls will manage to keep busy and fall will come all too soon for them, if not for mother.

Photograph by A. Devaney

Rok nasi eae a sks.

JUNE 2, 1956 No. 11

The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill PRESS...

READ BY COTTON GINNERS, COTTONSEED CRUSHERS AND OTHER OILSEED PROCESSORS FROM CALIFORNIA TO THE CAROLINAS

THE COTTON GIN AND Oil MILL PRESS

WALTER B. MOORE Editor

WASHINGTON REPRESENTATIVE (EDITORIAL ONLY)

FRED BAILEY

744 Jackson Place, N.W. Washington 6, D. C.

kk OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF:

National Cottonseed Products Association

National Cotton Ginners’ ; Association j

Published by HAUGHTON PUBLISHING COMPANY

Alabama Cotton Ginners’ Association

Arizona Ginners’ Association #

RICHARD HAUGHTON Chairman of the Board

Arkansas-Missouri Ginners’ Association

DICK HAUGHTON, JR.

California Cotton Ginners’ ; a President and Advertising Manager

Association

The Carolinas Ginners’ Association

GEORGE H. TRAYLOR

Executive Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer

a. : Georgia Cotton Ginners’ Association é

Louisiana-Mississippi Cotton Ginners’ Association

New Mexico Cotton Ginners’ Association

IVAN } CAMPBELL Vice-President

B. P. RIDGWAY

Vice-President and General Superintendent

«

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:

Domestic: 1 year $3; 2 years $5; 3 years $7. Foreign: Latin- American countries $10; all others $15 per year. (Not accepted for “Iron Curtain” countries.) All subscriptions cash with order.

Oklahoma Cotton Ginners’ Association

Tennessee Cotton Ginners’ Association

Texas Cotton Ginners’ Association

*

Tue Cotton GIN AND Om Mit Press is the Official Magazine of the foregoing associations for official communications and news releases, but the associations are in no way responsible for the editorial expressions or policies contained herein.

x * *

EXECUTIVE AND EDITORIAL OFFICES: 3116 COMMERCE STREET, DALLAS 26, TEXAS

A PROGRESSIVE AND RESPONSIBLE PUBLICATION

JUNE 2, 1956

It’s Sturdy!

After more than five years research, Watson has perfected a STORMPROOF cotton strain. Easily adapted to mechanical harvesting or hand snapping. Watson’s STORMPROOF is quality bred cotton and will not waste away in the field.

@ MATURES EARLY @ A LIGHTER FOLIAGE @ HIGHLY PROLIFIC

AS POPULAR AS EVER WATSON’S

QUALITY STRAINS

@ WATSON’S PEDIGREED

@ WATSON’S NEW ROWDEN @ WATSON’S STONEVILLE 62 @ WATSON’S EMPIRE

FERRIS WATSON

SEED COMPANY

GARLAND (Dallas County) TEXAS

THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS

Here’s Quality at Its Best!

INDO

LB. 21 LB. TARE

The Best Buy in Bagging

LUDLOW MANUFACTURING & SALES COMPANY

Atlanta, Ga. ® Stockton, Calif. © Los Angeles 58, Calif. © Memphis, Tenn. ® Galveston, Texas ® Gulfport, Miss. ® Needham Heights, Mass.

THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS * JUNE 2, 1956

Greater production from gins

HERE’S HOWS Use Texaco Texspray Com-

pound —the outstanding cotton conditioner for over 20 years. Now in use in more than 1600 gins from coast to coast, Texaco Texspray Compound assures

* greater production

*& better lint quality

* lower dryer temperatures * elimination of saw clogging * reduction of static electricity

Texaco Texspray Compound is applied automati-

cally to the seed cotton. Your Texaco Man will gladly give you full details.

For diesel engine lubrication, use one of the famous Texaco Ursa Oils—a complete line especially refined and processed to assure more power with less fuel over longer periods between overhauls.

Just call the nearest of the more than 2,000 Texaco Distributing Plants in the 48 States, or write:

bd wv Ww

The Texas Company, 135 East 42nd Street, New

York 17, N. Y.

TEXACO Lubricants and Fuels

FOR COTTON GINS AND OIL MILLS

TUNE IN... TEXACO STAR THEATER starring JIMMY DURANTE on television . .

JUNE 2, 1956

. Saturday nights, NBC.

THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS

Oklahoma Has Unique Research Foundation

Since 1948, cotton has benefited from industry’s united backing of a broad program of aid for state’s research institutions.

KLAHOMA Cotton Research Foun-

dation is contributing much toward making King Cotton’s throne more se- cure in Oklahoma.

The Research Foundation, the dream of the late Horace Hayden, ginning and crushing leader, was established in 1948. It had as its primary objective helping Oklahoma cotton farmers produce and market a higher yield of a better grade of cotton. The progress that the cotton industry of the state has made during the past eight years is due in no small part to the Cotton Research Founda- tion’s efforts.

Marion Lucas of the Chickasha Cot- ton Oil Mill is president of the Foun- dation, but is quick to give credit for any results of the organization to oth- ers of the Foundation and to work of Oklahoma Experiment Station and Ex-

MARION LUCAS, Chickasha, has contributed much to the research program as president of the Foundation, but emphasizes that the work is a result of the efforts of

many persons.

tension Service for carrying this infor- mation to the field.

Among its many activities is the work done in encouraging in a financial way cotton research projects by Okla- homa Experiment Station. Help has been extended to the Cotton Research Sta- tion at Chickasha to the extent that the Station now has a modern gin and greenhouse among its other facilities to be used in conducting cotton research. Approximately 90 percent of the Foun- dation’s money is spent for research fa- cilities in connection with cotton pro- duction and marketing, according to Lucas.

The Foundation sponsors demonstra- tion farms over the state in which Ex- periment Station personnel, working with local county agents and farmers, further test and apply the latest de-

THIS EXHIBIT, prepared by Oklahoma Cotton Ginners’ Association, helped to tell visitors at the recent Southwestern Exposition of the importance of cotton and the work that the Foundation and other organizations are doing.

THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS

* JUNE 2, 1956

velopments of research under farm ba- sis conditions. These demonstration farms can be credited with a faster ac- ceptance and use of cotton research.

The Foundation has teamed up with entomologists of A. & M. to assist with research in insect control work. The effectiveness of this work is indicated by the fact that many Oklahoma farm- ers report a return of $4 for $1 invested in cotton insect control measures. Irri- gation and fertilization, as well as the use of improved machinery in produc- tion and harvesting, have helped the cotton farmer stay on top of the cost- price situation in cotton the past few years.

The Foundation has not limited its activities to work with adults. A junior program that involves in part sponsor- ship of 4-H and FFA educational tours to major cotton producing areas of the country gives junior cotton growers an opportunity to learn more about cotton production from their neighbors to the south and west first hand. The first trip was to the Mississippi Delta coun- try and this year’s trip will include Arizona and other sections where irri- gation and mechanical production and harvesting play major roles in cotton production.

The Foundation is by no means a one-man show. The funds used in organ- izing the Foundation were contributed mostly by the cotton industry as is the money with which it continues to op- erate. According to Lucas, most state gins made initial conrtibutions of $50 each toward establishing the Founda- tion; the cotton oil mills of the state set aside 10 cents per ton on all cotton- seed processed for Foundation funds; the cotton compresses gave $250 for each compress; and cotton merchants, banks, and allied interests ail pitched in funds to get the Foundation under way on a workable basis.

It is maintained by voluntary contri- butions. Farmers pay five cents per bale, the oil mills set aside five cents per ton of cottonseed processed, and

(Continued on Page 49)

7

legend —~—- Gir lines

_ | temperature | recording -~—+— capillary lines cotton controller oogans 4 temperature transmitter wad to burner operotor f Se ae or ( temperature 2 "aa overflow transmitter pickup from t temperature a pit ie distributer dryer bur t dryer ' extractor extractor " burner operator burner operator ana

SJ) ft SSI tt

blower ==

Taleler-tim a) ol geohZ-ToM fal-tiaeleal-Jalt-tilola Milo) m= aaleli-ti01a- Mietol ali fed |

flaney well

Air-O-Motor operators

Temperature controllers

(Fig. 1 in diagram) give flex- ible pneumatic control to actuate a diaphragm-motor type of final control device. Bypass panel lets the operator take over on manual control instantaneously. Can be lo- cated anywhere in the mill.

Tel-O-Set transmitter

(Fig. 2 in diagram) detects temperature at the dryer, re- lays a pneumatic signal to the control instrument. Simple, rugged construction features easy calibration and range changing in the field. Located near point of measurement.

(Fig. 3 in diagram) move dampers, louvres or valves in response to control signals from the instrument. Mounted near burner.

For better ginning...

control your

cotton moisture

with Honeywell instrumentation

| engeeonae CONTENT of raw cotton makes a big difference in efficiency of ginning and cleaning. And in the quality of cotton fiber, too.

When cotton is too wet, it’s difficult to clean. Dirt and foreign matter stick to it. Wet cotton gets matted on ginning blades... interferes with ginning . . . often causes shut- downs for cleaning.

Overdried cotton, on the other hand, becomes so brittle that it’s hard to handle in spinning and weaving. It won’t take dyes properly. Dried foreign matter breaks up into small fragments that can’t be readily removed.

With Honeywell instrumentation you can feed your ginning process cotton of just the right moisture content. Heat input to the air heaters is automatically controlled to com-

H

BROWN

pensate for variations in the moisture con- tent of cotton from the fields.

A staff of Honeywell textile process control specialists will design a system to match the requirements of your ginning equipment. The instruments used are standard Honey- well products now at work in thousands of textile mills all over the world.

Investigate Honeywell control now . . . before the ginning season starts. Your local Honey- well sales engineer will be glad to give com- plete facts, and to arrange for installation in time to put it to work in this year’s produc- tion. Call him today . . . he’s as near as your phone.

MINNEAPOLIS-HONEYWELL REGULATOR Co., Industrial Division, Wayne and Windrim Avenues, Philadelphia 44, Pa.—in Canada, Toronto 17, Ontario.

MINNEAPOLIS

Honeywell

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Tout we Coitiol

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~*~

PRESIDENT Harry S. Baker, Fresno, Calif., is shown on the left as he is handed the gavel by Retiring President E. H.

Lawton of Hartsville, S.C., at the final session of the National Cottonseed Products Association convention in Dallas. The picture on the right shows, in usual order, E. L. Puckett, Amory, Miss., and D. B. Denney, Wolfe City, Texas, as

they welcome Charles B.

At Dallas Convention

Cottonseed Crushers Elect Harry Baker President

= LARGE ATTENDANCE at NCPA meeting as oil millers and guests enjoy many entertainment features and business discussions.

OTTONSEED PROCESSORS and guests from all parts of the Cotton Belt met in Dallas May 21-22 at the sixtieth convention of National Cotton- seed Products Association, chose Harry S. Baker of Fresno, Calif., as president, and enjoyed discussions of industry de- velopments and the entertainment fea- tures. The Statler Hilton Hotel, convention headquarters, was the site of a number

TWO LEADERS who have been at- tending NCPA meetings for 51 years are shown below: E. R. Barrow of Memphis and T. C. Law of Atlanta. These two chemists have contributed much to the industry’s progress.

of pre-convention committee meetings, including those of the rules and chem- ists’ committees, and of a reception on Sunday, given by Mr. and Mrs. J. Kirby McDonough and The Murray Co. of Texas, before the formal opening of the convention on Monday morning. Monday Session

Joe Flaig, Dallas, a director and past president of NCPA and leader in local arrangements for the convention, called the initial business session to order. T. J. Harrell, Forth Worth, welcomed the visitors and Robert F. Patterson, Trenton, Tenn., responded to the wel- come address.

Following announcements and other business, the convention heard the an- nual report of the 1955-56 president, E. H. Lawton of Hartsville, S.C.

e Wiggins Address “Economic Falla- cies and State Socialism” was the title of a featured address by A. L. M. Wig- gins, industrial leader from Hartsville, S.C., who warned that this country, sooner or later, must pay the price of “our desertion of the principles of indi- vidual freedom and responsibility upon which this nation was founded.

“The real test,” said Wiggins, “will then come as to whether this nation will take the path that has been followed by so many others—the broad highway of more and more socialism.”

He quoted Herbert Hoover’s recent statement: “Our greatest danger is not from invasion by foreign armies... but that we commit suicide from within by complaisance with evil,” and asked: “Will the American people have the moral fortitude, the political courage and the stamina to resist popular clam- or and re-anchor our government to the foundations of individual freedom and

Shuman, president, American Farm Bureau, one of the guest speakers.

opportunity and incentive under the system of democratic government as conceived and established by our found- ing fathers?”

The answer, Wiggins concluded, de- pends upon the political, business and moral leadership of such men as those in his audience.

e Bethke Address A representative of one of the nation’s leading formula feed firms, Dr. R. M. Bethke, Ralston Pu- rina Co., St. Louis, warned the cotton- seed crushers that they must do a bet- ter job of producing quality meal to meet competition and the requirements of users of their product. His address is summarized in a separate article in this issue of The Press.

e Industry Reports Committee re- ports during the first business session included those of the rules, research, charter and by-laws and public rela- tions committees.

The annual report of the Association’s Educational Service was presented by A. L. Ward, director, and his staff, and depicted some of the many activities to aid the production of better quality products and encourage wider use of these feed products.

John F. Moloney, Memphis, made a report on his first full year as secre- tary-treasurer of the organization.

Committee activity, Moloney pointed out, is one of the keys to the Associa- tion’s effectiveness, and the committee system makes it possible for all mem- bers who are able and willing to do so to participate in Association work.

The secretary-treasurer reviewed other activities of the organization and called the membership’s attention to the com- plete information which will appear in the convention proceedings. As in the past, these will be published soon by The Cotton Gin and Oil Mill Press, of- ficial publication of NCPA, and sent to all members. The proceedings this year will be dedicated to the memory of the late A. J. Chapman, who for more than 30 years had been the official reporter of these annual meetings of NCPA.

Tuesday Session

Trent C. Root, vice-president, South- ern Methodist University, Dallas, was the first guest speaker on the program Tuesday morning.

He reviewed some of the current

trends in government and proposed a four-point program: 1. Re-definition of the division of

powers between the federal government and the state.

2. Re-definition of the anti-trust and monopoly laws so that large size, alone, will not be a violation of the law.

3. A limit on the percentage of a single income that can be taxed away by the federal government.

4. A resolution on the part of every- one to ask the federal government for less.

e Shuman Address Political motives, rather than a real desire to solve farm problems, have dominated recent con- gressional actions, it was charged by the other guest speaker at this session, Charles B. Shuman, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Shuman blamed most of the current farm difficulties on government pro- grams which have encouraged the ac- cumulation of price-depressing sur- pluses.

“Cotton gives us a tragic example of the danger in government price fixing,” he said. “We have had price supports on cotton at 90 percent of parity or higher for many years. In spite of dras- tic cuts in acreage, the supply is near an all-time record. Prices are down.

“And what about our markets?

“Our high price supports have en- couraged cotton production abroad to

CONVENTION

SCENES BELOW are:

such an extent that foreign cotton pro-

duction will meet foreign demand in the next two years if present trends continue.

“At the same time, cotton price sup- ports have encouraged substitution of synthetics for cotton in this country. We have lost a large part of both our domestic and our foreign market.

“It is hard to gain a market back once it is lost. Once competition is es- tablished it is difficult to overcome.”

Shuman said one danger in high price supports is that they distort the rela- tionship between prices of competing commodities.

“One factor in the tremendous growth of the soybean industry has been the cottonseed price support program. The cottonseed industry got the support but the soybean industry got an advantage in the market.”

The Farm Bureau spokesman praised aggressive disposal programs as _ es- sential, but added that, at the same time, “we must have means of halting additions to the surplus stockpile. We

must shrink our total agricultural plant.” Farm price support programs, he

concluded, “should enhance the farmer’s right to earn a good income. This is quite different from price fixing pro- grams, which curtail, rather than ex- pand, opportunities in agriculture.’

e Activity Reports Committees re-

Top left, presidents of two national

organizations

porting at this session included insur- ance, traffic, uniform feed laws and special committees.

Executive Vice-President T. H. Greg- ory in his annual report called atten- tion to the fact that the past season was the first in five years when all of the industry’s products were sold in the markets rather than to the govern- ment.

Gregory outlined the outlook for the season ahead. from the standpoint of governmental policies, and discussed the situation with regard to the basic prod- ucts of the cotton oil mill.

“Let’s not make the error,” Gregory in speaking of the 1956-57 son, “of becoming involved in any gram that will accumulate new pluses of our products and turn markets over to competitors.”

Work of the general counsel of the Association during the past year was summarized by A. B. Pittman in his re- port at this session.

Other business was completed during this final session, including the setting of dues for 1956-57.

Dues for crushing mills in the U.S. are the same as last year, and other dues are the same as in 1955-56 except for minor variations.

said sea- pro- sur-

our

e Officers and Directors The election of Harry S. Baker as president took place at this session. A brief biograph-

(Continued on Page 38)

visit between sessions—

Colonel Francis J. Beatty, Charlotte, N.C., left, head of the National Cotton Council; and Winston Lovelace, Loving, N.M., head of National Cotton Ginners’ Association. Top right: Jo Jackson, Dallas, discusses the market situation with E. F.

Czichos, Chicago; and J. Ben Perry, Grenada, Miss. Bottom left, W. T.

Melvin,

Rocky Mount, N.C.; E. G. McKenzie,

Macon, Ga.; and H. L. McPherson, Kershaw, S.C., examine one of the prizes. Bottom right, W. P. Hayne, Alexandria,

La., waits at the registration desk as Mrs. Joe Flaig and Mrs. J. S. Florence Martin of NCPA to be sure they have tickets to everything.

LeClereq,

Jr., both of Dallas, check with Mrs.

\

NATIONAL

} COTTONSE

PRODU" ‘soc!

Advertisements Feature

Cotton Cushioning

Cotton cushioning is being featured in advertising appearing frequently in

trade and consumer publications, the National Cotton Batting Institute re- ports. Advertising draws a parallel be-

tween the clothing and cushioning fields, with such headlines as “You dress cool- er in cotton and you sleep cooler on cot- ton cushioning.”’

The 1956 advertising schedule in- cludes the following publications:

House Beautiful, February, April, August.

Ladies’ Home Journal, April, June, October.

McCall’s, May, Bedding Merchandiser,

July, September. March, April,

May, June, September, October. Furniture Retailer, January, March, April, June, August, October.

Furniture Retailer, January through December.

Retailing Daily, peng 20, April 24, May 22, June 19, Aug. Sept. 25.

Upholstering, Farce Beg Merch, April, June, August, September.

Data Available on PL 480 Sales of Edible Oils

Detailed information of sales of cot- tonseed oil and soybean oil under Public Law 480 financing for exports has been published by USDA. This information a circular is- Foreign Agricultural Ser- USDA, Washington 25.

is available in FFO 4-56, sued by the vice,

e Short Course Planned

.

For Superintendents PLANS for the twenty-fourth short course for oil mill operators at Texas A. & M. College, College Station, have been completed by the sponsoring groups—Texas A. & M., Texas Cotton- seed Crushers’ Association and the In- ternational Oil Mill Superintendents’ As- sociation. The short course will be held June 25-26-27 on the college campus, with the visitors staying at Memorial Student Center.

Reservations should be made with Dr. J. D. Lindsay, head, chemical engineer- ing department, Texas A. & M. Regis- tration fee is $10 per person, and rooms will average about $3.50 nightly per person.

General meetings for discussion will be heid in the Student Center each morn- ing. Laboratory work will be conducted in the Cottonseed Products Research Laboratory in the afternoons. In addi- tion, there will be sessions held in the afternoons and evenings in the Student Center so that mill operations may be discussed in small groups on individual problems of interest.

There will be a banquet and a barbe- cue. The barbecue will be furnished by Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Association.

Doctor Lindsay will preside at the opening session June 25 and Gibb Gil- christ, chancellor emeritus of Texas A.

& M., will welcome the group. H. D. Reeves, Simmons Cotton Oil Mills, T. S. Pryor, South Texas Cotton

Oil Co., and O. J. Jones, Western Cotton- oil Co., will share the responsibilities of

program chairman at the three sessions.

Twenty-Fifth Anniversary For Research Center

Hercules Powder Co. Research Center recently observed its twenty-fifth an- niversary.

Located seven miles west of Wilming- ton, Del., Hercules Research Center to- day employs approximately 750 men and women, under the direction of Dr. Peter Van Wyck. Most of the staff are specialists and technicians, and almost 300 of them professional scientists and engineers. In 1931, there were 125 em- ployes, most of whom were transferred from Hercules’ laboratories at Kenvil, N.J, established in 1915.

The company’s expenditures for re- search at the time of opening of the Experiment Station were about $450,- 000 annually. At the present time, the rate is almost $8 million annually for the Hercules research program.

“The basic concept is still the same —the extension of man’s useful knowl- edge concerning chemical materials for industry,” pointed out Dr. Robert W. Cairns, Hercules’ director of research.

“In this first quarter century we have built an organization of skilled scientists and engineers, backed by the finest buildings and research equip- ment, to perform truly as a research center for Hercules and the industries we serve. Our work covers all phases of the research process, from the search for new chemical ideas to the commer- cial development of new manufacturing processes and product application,” Doctor Cairns said.

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THE COTTON GIN AND OIL MILL PRESS

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The COTTON GIN and OIL MILL PRESS

e No Joy over Farm Law The longest and one of the hottest farm battles in years is over, for this year, but there is no joy of victory in Washington. The new law changes little for farmers, and politically it was a draw.

The Administration got pretty much what it asked for, but the Democrats forced the President to back away from the flexible price support system so dear to the heart of Secretary Benson.

The Democratic Congress couldn’t get the 90 percent of parity supports it asked for, but didn’t really want very badly. The leaders had expected the veto and had intended to let it stand, but Eisenhower out-maneuvered them with an executive order boosting props for several politically important com- modities.

There is no sign now of any signifi- cant “farm belt revolt.” Democrats lost the opportunity to lead one and Eisen- hower squelched the threat by putting Benson in the background.

e Farm Issue Secondary Top political strategists of both parties here think

farm issues will be demoted to a sec- ondary role in the political campaign, at least so far as the Presidential election is concerned. Peace and prosperity will be restored to top political billing.

The feeling here is that Eisenhower will walk away with the election, but that Democrats very probably will re- tain a majority in both the Senate and House. Some Democrats, privately, are conceding that.

Democratic campaign strategy seems to be shifting. According to some in- siders, here is what is now going on back of the scenes in high party coun- cils.

There is a life-and-death struggle, so

the story goes, for Democratic party control. That is between the Southern conservatives and the extreme labor-

liberal group of the North. That strug- gle is paramount to the election of the next President.

These same sources hint strongly that Kefauver is backed by some peo- ple who expect to put Governor Averill Harriman over as the nominee. They say the strategy is to “kill off” Steven-

son, politically, ahead of the conven- tion.

There is no intention among those political strategists to let Kefauger have first place on the ticket. They may, however, let him have the vice- presidential nomination, with Harriman heading the ticket.

The farm bill battle, to a considera- ble extent, reflects the political think- ing and direction of both major parties. Southern Democrats, who retain control of Congress, put everything they had into the first farm bill. It passed only because they drew more support from corn and wheat Republicans than they lost among liberal Democrats.

Eisenhower in his veto message cut sharply into that support by boosting wheat props this year to $2 a bushel, upping corn to $1.50 a bushel and in- cluding a new provision for supporting corn grown by those who flount the acreage control program.

He eased the dairyland resentment by boosting milk spports and by suspend- ing the usual summer drop in fluid milk prices in most milk marketing or- der areas. That compensated, in part at least, for the upping of feed grain sup- ports, especially corn.

The Republican idea was to gain votes in the politically critical Midwest, without losing too many elsewhere. The Soil Bank, it was conceded, will not win votes for either party, in any part of the country. Enthusiasm for the Soil Bank died a slow death, but no one wanted to say anything bad about it.

e Some Gains for South Southern Democrats did succeed in forcing Eisen- (Continued on Page 39)

HIGH EFFICIENCY DUST COLLECTORS AND TRAVELING TELESCOPES

ne

NEW LOOK

IN TRAVELING TELESCOPES

@ STURDY STEEL TRACK

@ ANGLE RING CONNECTIONS

@ ALL METAL BOOTLESS TYPE SWIVEL HEAD @ SEALED BALL BEARING ROLLER HANGER

@ ONE PIECE HORIZONTAL PIPE

@ TELESCOPE BARRELS UP TO 12 FOOT LENGTHS IN 1 PIECE

@ BALL BEARING ROPE PULLEYS

HIGH EFFICIENCY CYCLONE DUST COLLECTORS

To help solve your problems concerning dust and other gin waste . .

install HIGH EFFICIENCY CYCLONE DUST COLLECTORS. cyclones are MORE EFFICIENT than large cyclones.

Small diameter

However, because of

their low capacity, multiple units consisting of 2 or 4 collectors must be

installed in most cases.

This collector MUST BE PROPERLY SIZED; to do this, the size and make